Roger Dubuis Quatour

mtr_roger-dubuis_excalibur-quatuor_excalibur-quatuor_rddbex0367_0The latest star watch from Roger Dubuis is the 2013 Excalibur Quatuor — its has four sprung balances, requires 2,400 hours to build, and is the result of 7 years of research.

One of the reasons the Excalibur Quatuor is so unique is that it moves away from a traditional watch “complication” known as the tourbillon that has been lauded by watch manufacturers for its aesthetic beauty. The tourbillon mechanism improves the time-telling accuracy of a watch and is typically found on the face of expensive brands who want to show off the craftsmanship of the piece.

Instead, Roger Dubuis and movement development designer Gregory Bruttin created four sprung balances for the Excalibur Quatuor. A balance spring or balance wheel is not new in watch manufacturing, but what Dubuis and Bruttin did differently was to have not one, but four balances that work in tandem for unprecedented accuracy.

Roger Dubuis Silicon Excalibur Quatuor watch

The Excalibur Quatuor has four sprung balances, each set at a 45 degree angle.

The balances are each set at 45 degree angles and work in pairs to continuously factor in gravity. The watch’s balances are so precise, in fact, that they can even account for the wearer’s movement.

The sound of the watch is also unique. Each balance pulses four times per second, and no two balances oscillate simultaneously. That means instead of the classic ticking of the watch, it sounds more akin to the whirring of a machine.

Roger Dubuis Silicon Excalibur Quatuor watch

The watch itself is made of 590 distinct parts and has a 40-hour power reserve function that is so high-tech, the company has applied for a patent.

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